Proposals and comments | University of Tartu
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Contacts of UT units

Faculty of Arts and Humanities
Faculty phone: 
(+372) 737 5341
Faculty address: 
Jakobi 2 - 116-121, 51014, Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    + 372 737 5341
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, rooms 116 - 121, 51014, Tartu
  • Institute of History and Archaeology
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5651
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, 51003, Tartu
  • Institute of Estonian and General Linguistics
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5221
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, 51014, Tartu
  • Institute of Philosophy and Semiotics
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5314
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, III, rooms 309-352, 51014, Tartu
  • Institute of Cultural Research
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5223
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 16, 51003, Tartu
  • School of Theology and Religious Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5301
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18-310, 50090, Tartu
  • College of Foreign Languages and Cultures
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, 51003, Tartu
  • Viljandi Culture Academy
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 435 5232
    Faculty address: 
    Posti 1, 71004, Viljandi
Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty phone: 
(+372) 737 5957
Faculty address: 
Lossi 36, 51003, Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    + 372 737 5900
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, 51003, Tartu
  • Institute of Education
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6440
    Faculty address: 
    Salme 1a, room 29, 50103, Tartu
  • Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5582
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, roomm 301, 51003, Tartu
  • School of Economics and Business Administration
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6310
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 4, 50409, Tartu
  • Institute of Psychology
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5902
    Faculty address: 
    Näituse 2, 50409, Tartu
  • School of Law
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5390
    Faculty address: 
    Näituse 20, 50409, Tartu
  • Institute of Social Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5188
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, 51003, Tartu
  • Narva College
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 740 1900
    Faculty address: 
    Raekoja plats 2, 20307, Narva
  • Pärnu College
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 445 0520
    Faculty address: 
    Ringi 35, 80012, Pärnu
Faculty of Medicine
Faculty phone: 
(+372) 737 5326
Faculty address: 
Ravila 19, 50411, Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5326
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 19, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine
    Faculty phone: 
    +(372) 737 4210
    Faculty address: 
    Biomeedikum, Ravila 19, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Pharmacy
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5286
    Faculty address: 
    Nooruse 1, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Dentistry
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 731 9856
    Faculty address: 
    Raekoja plats 6, 51003, Tartu
  • Institute of Clinical Medicine
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5323
    Faculty address: 
    L. Puusepa 8, 51014, Tartu, Eesti
  • Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 4190
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Sport Sciences and Physiotherapy
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5360
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 5-205, 51014, Tartu
Faculty of Science and Technology
Faculty phone: 
(+372) 737 5820
Faculty address: 
Vanemuise 46-208, 51014, Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5820
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46 - 208, 51014, Tartu
  • Institute of Computer Science
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5445
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 2, 50409, Tartu
  • Estonian Marine Institute
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 671 8902
    Faculty address: 
    Mäealuse 14, 12618, Tallinn
  • Institute of Physics
    Faculty address: 
    W. Ostwaldi Str 1, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Chemistry
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5261
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 14a, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Mathematics and Statistics
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5860
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 2, 50409, Tartu
  • Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5011
    Faculty address: 
    Riia 23, 23b-134, 51010, Tartu
  • Institute of Technology
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 4800
    Faculty address: 
    Nooruse 1, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5835
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46, 51014, Tartu
Institutions
  • Library
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5702
    Faculty address: 
    W.Struve 1, 50091, Tartu
  • Youth Academy
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5581
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 38, 51003, Tartu
  • Estonian Genome Center
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 4000
    Faculty address: 
    Riia 23b, 51010, Tartu
  • Museum
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5674
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 25, 51014, Tartu
  • University of Tartu Natural History Museum and Botanical Garden
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6076
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46, 51014, Tartu
Support Units
  • Administrative Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5606
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51014, Tartu
  • University Office in Tallinn
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6600
    Faculty address: 
    Teatri väljak 3, 10143 Tallinn
  • Estates Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5137
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51014, Tartu
  • Finance Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5125
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 4, 51014, Tartu
  • Information Technology Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6000, arvutiabi: 737 5500
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51014, Tartu
  • Internal Audit Office
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 17-114, 51014, Tartu
  • Marketing and Communication Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5687
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, ruum 210, 50090, Tartu
  • Office of Academic Affairs
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6215
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090, Tartu
  • Office of Research and Development
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6192
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, III korrus, 51003, Tartu
  • Human Resources Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5145
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, rooms 302 and 304, 50090, Tartu
  • Rector's Strategy Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5600
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 51014, Tartu
  • Student Council
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5400
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18b, 51014, Tartu
Other Units
  • University of Tartu Academic Sports Club
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5371
    Faculty address: 
    Ujula 4, 51008 Tartu
  • Tartu Student Village
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 740 9959
    Faculty address: 
    Narva mnt 25, 51013 Tartu
  • Tartu Students’ Club
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 730 2400
    Faculty address: 
    Kalevi 24, 51010 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Press
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5945
    Faculty address: 
    W. Struve 1, 50091 Tartu
  • Tartu University Hospital
    Faculty address: 
    L. Puusepa 1a, 50406 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Foundation
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5852
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu
  • View all other units

Contacts of UT units

Faculty of Arts and Humanities
Faculty phone: 
(+372) 737 5341
Faculty address: 
Jakobi 2 - 116-121, 51014, Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    + 372 737 5341
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, rooms 116 - 121, 51014, Tartu
  • Institute of History and Archaeology
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5651
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, 51003, Tartu
  • Institute of Estonian and General Linguistics
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5221
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, 51014, Tartu
  • Institute of Philosophy and Semiotics
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5314
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, III, rooms 309-352, 51014, Tartu
  • Institute of Cultural Research
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5223
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 16, 51003, Tartu
  • School of Theology and Religious Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5301
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18-310, 50090, Tartu
  • College of Foreign Languages and Cultures
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, 51003, Tartu
  • Viljandi Culture Academy
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 435 5232
    Faculty address: 
    Posti 1, 71004, Viljandi
Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty phone: 
(+372) 737 5957
Faculty address: 
Lossi 36, 51003, Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    + 372 737 5900
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, 51003, Tartu
  • Institute of Education
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6440
    Faculty address: 
    Salme 1a, room 29, 50103, Tartu
  • Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5582
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, roomm 301, 51003, Tartu
  • School of Economics and Business Administration
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6310
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 4, 50409, Tartu
  • Institute of Psychology
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5902
    Faculty address: 
    Näituse 2, 50409, Tartu
  • School of Law
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5390
    Faculty address: 
    Näituse 20, 50409, Tartu
  • Institute of Social Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5188
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, 51003, Tartu
  • Narva College
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 740 1900
    Faculty address: 
    Raekoja plats 2, 20307, Narva
  • Pärnu College
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 445 0520
    Faculty address: 
    Ringi 35, 80012, Pärnu
Faculty of Medicine
Faculty phone: 
(+372) 737 5326
Faculty address: 
Ravila 19, 50411, Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5326
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 19, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine
    Faculty phone: 
    +(372) 737 4210
    Faculty address: 
    Biomeedikum, Ravila 19, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Pharmacy
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5286
    Faculty address: 
    Nooruse 1, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Dentistry
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 731 9856
    Faculty address: 
    Raekoja plats 6, 51003, Tartu
  • Institute of Clinical Medicine
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5323
    Faculty address: 
    L. Puusepa 8, 51014, Tartu, Eesti
  • Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 4190
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Sport Sciences and Physiotherapy
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5360
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 5-205, 51014, Tartu
Faculty of Science and Technology
Faculty phone: 
(+372) 737 5820
Faculty address: 
Vanemuise 46-208, 51014, Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5820
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46 - 208, 51014, Tartu
  • Institute of Computer Science
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5445
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 2, 50409, Tartu
  • Estonian Marine Institute
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 671 8902
    Faculty address: 
    Mäealuse 14, 12618, Tallinn
  • Institute of Physics
    Faculty address: 
    W. Ostwaldi Str 1, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Chemistry
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5261
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 14a, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Mathematics and Statistics
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5860
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 2, 50409, Tartu
  • Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5011
    Faculty address: 
    Riia 23, 23b-134, 51010, Tartu
  • Institute of Technology
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 4800
    Faculty address: 
    Nooruse 1, 50411, Tartu
  • Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5835
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46, 51014, Tartu
Institutions
  • Library
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5702
    Faculty address: 
    W.Struve 1, 50091, Tartu
  • Youth Academy
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5581
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 38, 51003, Tartu
  • Estonian Genome Center
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 4000
    Faculty address: 
    Riia 23b, 51010, Tartu
  • Museum
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5674
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 25, 51014, Tartu
  • University of Tartu Natural History Museum and Botanical Garden
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6076
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46, 51014, Tartu
Support Units
  • Administrative Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5606
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51014, Tartu
  • University Office in Tallinn
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6600
    Faculty address: 
    Teatri väljak 3, 10143 Tallinn
  • Estates Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5137
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51014, Tartu
  • Finance Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5125
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 4, 51014, Tartu
  • Information Technology Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6000, arvutiabi: 737 5500
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51014, Tartu
  • Internal Audit Office
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 17-114, 51014, Tartu
  • Marketing and Communication Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5687
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, ruum 210, 50090, Tartu
  • Office of Academic Affairs
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6215
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090, Tartu
  • Office of Research and Development
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 6192
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, III korrus, 51003, Tartu
  • Human Resources Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5145
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, rooms 302 and 304, 50090, Tartu
  • Rector's Strategy Office
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5600
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 51014, Tartu
  • Student Council
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5400
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18b, 51014, Tartu
Other Units
  • University of Tartu Academic Sports Club
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5371
    Faculty address: 
    Ujula 4, 51008 Tartu
  • Tartu Student Village
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 740 9959
    Faculty address: 
    Narva mnt 25, 51013 Tartu
  • Tartu Students’ Club
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 730 2400
    Faculty address: 
    Kalevi 24, 51010 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Press
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5945
    Faculty address: 
    W. Struve 1, 50091 Tartu
  • Tartu University Hospital
    Faculty address: 
    L. Puusepa 1a, 50406 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Foundation
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5852
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu
  • View all other units

Proposals and comments

Dear contributor,

Thank you for submitting your proposal for the university's development plan!

Already a brief glance at the more than fifty proposals that were received in the course of the summer
served to confirm the conviction that our employees, students and alumni have great ideas and a
willingness to have a say in the development of the university. We will deliberate all of the submitted
proposals with our colleagues and the Development Plan Committee in September and will uncover
what is meaningful and important.

The preliminary version of the development plan will be completed by the beginning of November,
and the autumn still has several discussions on the future trends of the university in store.

Sincerely,

Erik Puura
Vice-Rector for Development
 

1.

Name: -

Proposal/comment: There should be one common course page for entire university, and the division should be English/Estonian courses, further divided into subject (Tag clouds can be used to cluster them). We have to make more advance courses for the Master students, this will challenge them to achieve more greater heights. Along with this the UT should do more workshops which will bring more international researchers to share their experiences which will inturn motivate the students.

Position in the university: Employee

2.

Name: Freerk Molleman

Proposal/comment:
1)The university should strive for excellence in research and education, and
outreach to the general public.
2) The uniqueness of the University
a) Its almost peerless within the country
b) Its the smallest language with a full University program 'a' and 'b' make it 'cute' and this may help in international competition.

However, it hampers the University in its striving for excellence. The education and research are too often below international standards. Students should write their MSc thesis in English (the language of science). If written in Estonian, a lower grade and no possibility to apply for PHD studies should be installed. Books for PhD students should be in English. Do not waste money on translating textbooks for academics into Estonian or even write such books (this is currently happening: wasting valuable time and money!!). Estonian (a fine language) should be used for outreach to the general public and that is a laudable goal to spend money and time on. If there is funding for PHD positions, these should be competed for
internationally: Given the low scholarships, they will mainly be taken by Estonians, but other Nationalities will stream in and Estonian students will be forced to look abroad and be as good as (or better than) foreign candidates, which will greatly benefit science in Estonia and thus Estonia as
a whole.

A particular problem is the grade inflation associated with competition for PHD positions as a result of competition with the Life Science University:
Students get higher grades than they deserve just to give them an edge when applying for the PHD program.

2) What should be changed and what should be done differently at the University as compared to the current situation? What inhibits the development of the University?
A major problem which is not taken seriously is sexual relations between staff and students. Male professors in Estonia are allowed to get drunk and shamelessly hit on female students in full view. In other countries this would lead to immediate suspension/firing of the professor, even if he is a
Nobel laureate. There are also cases where professors have openly intimate relationships with students they are supposes to supervise or sign off on their PHD work.

In these cases, professors need to get 2 choices:
1) stop the relationship and choose their job, or
2) step down and choose for their lover.

Another area where much can be improved is collaboration. Many people are not aware or not willing to use each other’s expertise. Rather than admit they have not achieved much because they lack certain skills, they hide in their offices, hoping salary will still be paid (as is usual the case as loyalty is
strongly developed here). Informal meetings where preliminary stuff can be presented (which the presenter knows is just a first draft, nothing near perfect) are essential. The ego needs to be tuned down: not everything is a weighty lecture where a good impression needs to be made. The language is another hindrance to collaboration. As long as graduate courses and MSC students are not in English, international researchers can-not play a role in increasing the quality of Estonian Science Education.

Position in the university: Other

3.

Name: Unai Santos Marín

Proposal/comment:
In my few years in the university of Tartu I have seen several valuable colleagues leave us for better, and as a new course ends It is time for myself to think about my future in UT. The conclusion is always the same: the salary in UT doesn't allow for a minimal quality of living. In a context where good teaching and researching staff are mobile, such a bad salary is an open door for good professionals to emigrate to other universities, in spite of other advantages of UT. This terribly hampers the development of the University. In short, UT should ensure that salary allows teaching fellows a good quality of living, and out of moral reasons, that this salary is similar across different departments (humanities vs. IT) including the existence of optional bonuses.

Position in the university: Employee

4.

Name: -

Proposal/comment:
As a PhD student I would like to be in a more interactive environment where cross disciplinary ideas could be fruitfully discussed and proposed. Currently I feel like isolated and inert in terms of inter disciplinary
approaches.

University must have an English magazine apart from the news letter where students could express their academic views and experience.

Position in the university: Student

5.

Name: Josep Soler-Carbonell

Proposal/comment:
At present, I am working on a project dealing with the internationalization of higher education and the role/impact of English as a global language in non-English speaking countries. Naturally, my focus is in Estonia, and the project is being carried out at the Institute of Estonian and General Linguistics (FLEE). The project started last semester and I already have quite a few things to say about the topic. However, I will try to keep my comment here as short as possible. If needed, I can develop it further or be contacted later on to talk more about that (soler [ät] ut.ee).

In the project, I am focusing on Ph.D. students and how they feel about the need to effectively engage with the English language for their everyday work-related activities. Fieldwork will be conducted starting next course to look into that question in depth. Nevertheless, thus far I have looked up the languages in which Ph.D. dissertations are most commonly written at Estonian universities. In the period 2000-2012, a total of 1116 such works have been defended at Tartu University. From them, 876 were in English, 184 in Estonian, 36 in Russian and 20 in another language.

If we look at faculties, we find that Medicine Ph.D.s are only in English and the vast majority of theses at the faculty of Science and Technology too. Mathematics and Computer Science, Economics and Business Administration, Exercise and Sport Sciences, and Social Sciences and Education are also highly Englishized at that level. Only the faculties of Philosophy, Law and Theology provide some kind of balance, with Estonian being more predominant as a language in which Ph.D. dissertations are written there.

Most of the language policy documents that I have revised up to now, including the Language Principles of the University of Tartu (approved January 2009), try to foster a difficult balance between English and Estonian in higher education. One of the risks foreseen in these documents is for a particular field of knowledge to shift entirely into a foreign language (English). In that sense, Ph.D. dissertations can (could) act as a resource to enhance academic Estonian language and develop the necessary terminology and expressions in Estonian as well, promoting the desired balance between the two languages. At the moment, however, the fact that most theses are in English (especially in the realia and medicine areas) seems to be actually working against this possibility.

As we know, most of Ph.D. theses are a compilation of several articles, published or to be published in academic journals or as book chapters in edited volumes. At the same time, they also contain an extended introduction (of some 80 pages) where the doctoral student presents his or her work, how
the articles relate to the thesis project and its main findings. Most of the times, the articles are already in English, as they are published in English language journals. Therefore, I find it redundant that all or most of the articles are in English plus the extended introduction is also in English. Moreover, when this is the case, such dissertations should also provide an extended summary in Estonian, in theory. I say in theory because according to the Development Plan of the Estonian Language 2011-2017, 20% of theses written in a foreign language in 2010 did not include such a summary.

Consequently, I think promoting the use of Estonian language at Ph.D. level should be a priority for the university in the next few years. At the same time that we make sure that Tartu University scientists keep up their international level and profile (needless to say, in English), I don't think it would be too far fetched to promote some kind of more active presence of the national language in those extended introductory sections of Ph.D. dissertations consisting of articles (almost exclusively) in English.

How to implement this promotion, that is another issue and it would definitely require more thorough reflections than the ones I can provide here. To start with, resources are needed, and most importantly language resources. Some kind of language development unit could be created (if it doesn't exist already) to aid scientists from all fields when composing their texts in academic Estonian, offering help in terms of terminology and specific expressions, etc. Financial support from government institutions could also be searched. By way of example, for the last few years the Catalan government has offered to pay for the theses' publication costs (printing, binding, reproduction, etc.) to those who have written their work in Catalan. Each graduate receives a lump sum of 500 euros. I am very much unaware whether this is applicable in Estonia or not, as I don't know who bears those costs here, but that could also be something to think about.

Universities, and in particular public ones, should be very aware of their role in shaping the developments of a particular society and people in general, who are actually those supporting our work and paying for our salaries. How can the work conducted at such universities have a broad and meaningful impact into the general public, if some of the most important outcomes of such work, Ph.D. theses, are mostly in a foreign language (English)? I am quite sure that most people may not be interested in reading directly a doctoral dissertation, but it is also quite likely that such works could have an impact on the development of the language for specific purposes, in given fields. Teachers of science or mathematics at secondary or high schools, for instance, can be influenced by that language. Therefore, promoting the cultivation of Estonian language at the highest levels of higher education seems important in that sense.

I will leave it here, because I promised a brief comment and it got too long already. I would be very happy to be contacted later on to talk more about the subject, as I said before.

Thanks!

Position in the university: Employee

6.

Name: Marlon Dumas

Proposal/comment:
What are the needs and expectations of the society that the university should satisfy or shape?

To provide world-class education opportunities to Estonians across a broad spectrum of fields in humanities, social and exact sciences and technology.
To contribute to putting and maintaining Estonia at the forefront of knowledge economies and societies worldwide.
To project Estonia internationally as a knowledge society that is open to innovation while valuing tradition.
To contribute to preserving and developing Estonian history, language, art and culture.

What should be done differently in the university compared to the current situation, what should be changed, and what inhibits the development of the university?

The university currently lacks a well-grounded culture of striving to be a "world-class University" that competes with the top-300 universities worldwide.

More than 95% of academic positions advertised in University of Tartu's jobs web site in 2012 and first half of 2013 require functional or native knowledge of Estonian. The situation is so extreme that even the positions of senior lecturer and lecturer of English language, English culture and English literature advertised in March 2013, require excellent command of Estonian language.

This means that more than more than 1000 world-class scholars need to be found from a relatively small population, in an environment of intense competition for talent from other Estonian universities. Other universities in Estonia have taken strong steps to lifting barriers to attract international talent over University of Tartu. A University based in Tallinn for example currently advertises all its positions in the European Euraxess job portal, while University of Tartu has advertised less than 5% of its academic positions in that portal over the past 2 years. The same university in Tallinn is currently attracting proportionally more international students than University of Tartu. These are just examples to illustrate a current lack at University of Tartu of a broad-based desire to be "world-class".

There are pockets of world-class research and teaching, but no broad culture of being world-class and continuously striving for excellence. Some academic units perceive that their only role is to teach basic skills to handful of students in a given specialty.

The goal should be to instill a culture across University of Tartu to the point that every single academic staff member (and every employee in fact), will wake up every morning saying "Today I will conduct or contribute to support world-class research and teaching".

There is also insufficient proactive outreach to industry and a lack of an incentive system that would push academic staff members to create and nourish industry linkages. At present, the situation is such that employees are encouraged (even by the office of commercial services, TAO), to perform consultancy and industry engagement outside university channels rather than via university channels. When employees wish to conduct industry linkages be it via projects, consultancy or corporate training, red tape is put in front of them rather than proactive help to engage is long-lasting cooperation with industry. In particular, there is no system in place for systematic and effective management of consultancy and corporate training engagements, which are channels via which industry cooperation can be effectively developed.

Position in the university: Employee

7.

Name: Andriy Mozhyn

Proposal/comment: I'm studying SPA and Wellness Service Design and Management (International Master's Degree) in Parnu, and I found that in Tartu quite low developed SPA culture and promotion of healthy lifestyle. This is a problem, and I have some ideas how to change this situation. For instance, It would be great to open Student SPA (supported with UT) with affordable prices and main
objectives to promote conscious well-being starting from young ages.

Position in the university: Student

8.

Name: Andreas Schlesiger

Proposal/comment: Due to the fact that I am "just" an ERASMUS student and, therefore, a guest in your university, I cannot evaluate internal goals and strategy plans totally. Nonetheless, I would like to stress on the ERASMUS partnerships with several universities abroad. In order to maintain the university's outstanding position in the international ranking as well as to cope with the increase of students who are interested in coming to Tartu, you should still seek to be a host university also in future times. Tartu offers ideal requirements for living and studying. Use your potential and the
international reputation. New partnerships could be established.

Position in the university: Student

9.

Name: Onur Aydin Korkmaz

Proposal/comment:
Hello,
Tartu University is very old and famous in the region, known well by all neighbor countries, even in Russia. Unfortunately Tartu University is getting lose its reputation what I hear from friends in other countries. I believe in next years Tartu University will work on this to be one of the successful university in Europe.

Position in the university: Student

10.

Name: Djuddah A.J. Leijen

Proposal/comment:
As a lecturer of academic writing and as the head of the centre for academic writing and communication, I see, daily, the problems students and teachers have with the growing number of written tasks teachers give (and assess) and how students write up these tasks. In general, a survey conducted in 2009, revealed that academic writing and communication is part of students' and teachers' daily activity, but the support they receive to develop these skills in minimal, specifically related to academic writing.

The problem with academic writing is that most of the writing courses which are currently available, both Estonian and English, focus on language as a key component. The assumption being that students should know how to write when they enter university. This, however, is very problematic. Many students do not have problems with language, but have a structural problem with writing, both in English and Estonian. They do not know what an essay is and if they do know they realise that a teacher does not formulate clearly what he/she understands as an essay. Teachers do not adequately provide feedback to students' writing, because they lack the time or the skill to report on writing related issues (global issues such as style, register, argumentation, logic formulation of thesis etc.). In addition, most of the writing tasks are given to be delivered as a product, and we know in writing research that learning to write is a process and not a product; something we find out when we have to write a Master Thesis or starting a PhD.

In addition to these issues, at the centre for writing and communication, we often hear stories from students that their supervisors are unable to provide good and clear supervision on their writing process and as a result spend hours and hours struggling with writing up their papers, without being given any feedback how they are progressing. In principle, it is quite usual that a teacher/lecturer is unable to give adequate feedback. First of all, it is not their duty to teach students how to write (whose duty is it?) and secondly, because they don't have the time.

We, at the centre for academic writing and communication, are filling this void and offering students and teachers support in their writing and communication related problems, for free. We do this by educating students to become peer writing consultants, experts in detecting writing flaws and experts in finding solutions together with the student (basically offering a reader perspective).

We also propose to start educating faculties and department how to work with writing tasks, how to empower students to help each other, through peer feedback exercises and how teachers can make the feedback process easier and less time consuming. In order for us to continue to do our work, we hope that developing academic writing and communication becomes part of the strategic plan so our aims would have a greater purpose and would find additional support from faculty and department.

For more information about AVOK and our efforts see: http://keelekeskus.ut.ee/avok

Position in the university: Employee

11.

Name: -

Proposal/comment:
Until the University of Tartu starts to pay salaries to its research staff (not only professors) that guarantee a decent living, no strategic plan can give any positive result.  The current salaries are under a 1000 euros a month after taxes, ridiculous by any standard, in any country.

It is a shame that the University's budget is in record surplus (something boasted about by the new administration), while researchers have salaries that reduce us to hunger, demotivation, and loss of hope.

On top of that, there is no career security since contracts are short term. Years spent at work in the University are also not valued. As if that was not enough, any and every obstacle are placed to prevent promotion.

To other international academics thinking about a career in the University of Tartu: better think of another option where you are not spat at and humiliated upon.

Position in the university: Employee

12.

Name: -

Proposal/comment: Internationalization in large size markets such as BRICS, requires time and continually support, thus it requires a long-term version and strategy. A quality team is the key for implementation. UT needs a long-term perspective.

Position in the university: Employee

13.

Name: Jelena Grigorjeva

Proposal/comment:
I suggest to reform the humanities in the following way:
- less theory - more practice and expertise in all spheres
- more creativity, independent and field work
- more social practical applications
- less bureaucracy and predictability especially in evaluation
- more group works with clear motivation
- to reduce the claims for academic peer-preview publications
- popularisation comes to the first place

Position in the university: Employee

14. Name: Ott Toomet

Proposal/comment:

The most valuable capital of a university is probably the workforce, in particular highly qualified and internationally renowned specialists.

Currently I do not see much interest in attracting the best and the brightest, even inside the modest budgetary limits.  I would love to see the HR department (if TU has anything like that) to consciously target the best people, and offer them competitive salary and conditions necessary to get them here.  I agree that salary at TU currently just sucks, but too often it seems to be a convenient excuse for doing nothing.  Sometimes one could optimize teaching and curriculum, lower the number of mediocre staff, and hire one good specialist instead.  I do not even see interest for such an approach right now.

Second, I would like to see a lot more internationalization (at least 50% of the academic workers hired from other universities) and better integration of the international and local faculty members.  The current, mostly Estonian-based information flow is not particularly helpful in engaging the internationals.  Perhaps one should explicitly target those people when attempting to get them involved in the TU development and daily business?  Obviously, that would also require the locals to accept (occasionally) working in English...

Position in the university: Employee

15.

Name: Djuddah A.J. Leijen

Proposal/comment:
In addition to my earlier entry, I'd like to add another comment/proposal regarding a topic which has recently received a lot of attention in the
media: fraud and plagiarism. I'd like to include a link to an article I read in the English version of Postimees (http://news.postimees.ee/1291210/aaviksoo-fraud-more-widespread-than-we-...).
The minister of education and research is right to claim that the mindset of students should change; however, the question remains, how can you change the mindset of students and who is going to be responsible for changing these mindsets. In addition, what in students minds need to be changed? The article does, unfortunately, not touch upon the problem itself, or rather, it does not define what fraud is or what type of fraud is being committed. The article states that there is a gap between the old soviet system and the new system, but again fails to mention what this gap is and how this gap can be bridged. Fraud is mainly committed in writing, for example essays, theses, dissertations, take home written exams, etc: mainly written texts. The problem is that many students (mainly the ones that commit fraud -- lets call it plagiarism) are inadequately prepared for writing at University and receive very little support from teachers, lecturers, professors who come from this old soviet system. Even new lecturers who have been educated by lecturers from the old soviet regime have little experience when it comes to writing and supporting students in their endeavors to write well (without plagiarising). The problem is often in the assignments which are given, the feedback that is offered to the students and the control which is often not carried out. The main reason why students in the Unites States do not tolerate fraud is that there are enough measures (i.e. writing centres) who support and teach students how to write correctly (without the need to plagiarise). The issue is to investigate why students plagiarise (or commit
fraud) in the first place and then educate students (and educators) to do it correctly with adequate support.

AVOK (Akadeemilise väljendusoskuse keskus) http://www.keelekeskus.ut.ee/et/avok has taken it upon themselves to support students and teachers in learning how to write correctly and how to not need to commit fraud (plagiarise). I am quite sure that most students do not intentionally commit fraud, but do so because either they know they get away with it, and everybody does it for that course and nobody checks, or they are not aware they are committing fraud. If students know that they will be supported, taught, and will learn from it, they will stop committing fraud and will stop accepting it among their peers.

We, at AVOK, have modelled ourselves to European writing centres, which are spinoffs from North American writing centres to empower peers how to consult their fellow students (and teachers) how it should be done, how it can be done, under guidance of knowledgeable individuals. AVOK would certainly need the backing of the university to continue with their plans and we invite any interested parties to our centre located in Jakobi 2 room 131.

Djuddah A.J. Leijen
Lecturer at the Language Centre
Head of the Centre for Academic Writing and Communication | AVOK University of Tartu, Estonia

Position in the university: Employee

16.

Name: To Mr Molleman

Proposal/comment:
Would you be so kind as to tell me in which country can a person with such
astonishing views on the world as you obtain a PhD degree? After I had read
your comment out loud, my friend (an anthropologist with a minor in
ethnology) expressed such enthusiasm of visiting it that I am now seriously
considering to finance a scientific expedition there.

However, I thank you for raising one very important problem. I have always
found it extremely difficult to catch the professors even during their office
hours, let alone meet a professor whom one could consider a catch. Thus I
also consider it a major problem that fifty-something, utterly underpaid and
visibly awfully overstressed human specimen are now considered worth giving a
second glance among some people.

I would sincerely suggest to conduct an interdisciplinary study on the case -
the phenomenon sounds just as plausible as crop circles or Nazi bases in
Antarctica and should be researched accordingly.

Position in the university: Student

17.

Name: Gyaneshwer

Proposal/comment:
Since 7 years of my life working in Tartu, I have seen the rise of the University in many sense! However, in the era when technology is growing so fast, the University has to maintain its integrity as well as also be open to adopt the cutting edge technology. Below are some of the points-

It is also important to the University to keep Estonian language as a soul, though one may consider translating the e mails in to English as well while sending to the International staff. Google scholar sometimes completely change the meanings.

The public dissipation of the research is completely lacking and in spite of the fact that having many world-class researchers, University fails to bring its name in International media attention.

Extremely low stipend for PhD students is the main reason which is hampering incoming of International top students.

Overall, University has to balance loosing its unique name and culture vs adopting new things.

Thanks

Position in the university: Alumnus

18.

Name: Yury Orlovskiy

Proposal / comment:
To include the paragraph concerning an increase of the number of foreign qualified senior researchers up to 10% from all the University senior researchers.

Sincerely yours,
Yury Orlovskiy

Position in the university: Employee
19.

Nimi: Josep Soler-Carbonell

Ettepanek/kommentaar:
Some additions to my previous entry:

- There are many current ongoing debates about the challenges facing Estonian higher education. In language terms, whether Estonian and other languages (chiefly English) can coexist fruitfully seems a crucial one.

- The area of teaching is of particular importance: how to introduce more English-language courses and programs while keeping a relevant position for Estonian too. Related to that, there's the question of quality: how to ensure that the courses we offer are of good, high quality (whether the language of instruction is English or Estonian).

- Of crucial importance is also to know as much as possible about lecturers' skills and attitudes towards teaching in English (and/or other languages).

The same should be researched regarding students. This would also tell us what speakers on the ground feel that they need. Conducting a large scale survey would throw a lot of data that would enable university officials to have a much better informed picture of its reality. With that information, devising more effective policies would be an easier and more fruitful task.

- The results of such a survey would probably tell us something we already know intuitively: that reality looks very different for different disciplines. Each Faculty and Institute surely has its own workings and proceedings, and they have different and specific needs. This has to be aknowledged by policymakers and in language terms in particular, we should be aware that the "one size fits all" approach might not be the best strategy.

But to know specifically what reality looks like in different Faculties and what their members' needs are, we need research that looks into that.

- A possible way out of the difficult combination between Estonian and other languages (English) is to adopt a firm multilingual attitude. In terms of English, that means incorporating a view from the 'lingua franca' paradigm.

There exists ample research in that area, arguing compellingly that instead of linguistic correctness, we need to place emphasis on linguistic effectiveness.

- Finally, the issue of funding is of major importance: to be able to provide adequate language support (for the development of terminological dictionaries, proof-reading of articles, essays and theses, writing of extended Estonian-language summaries of Ph.D. theses written in another language, etc.); to attract top-level scholars and retain the brightest talents by paying attractive salaries; to support international mobility of local scholars, etc.

Seos ülikooliga: Töötaja

20.

Nimi: -

Ettepanek/kommentaar:
There should be better appreciation for researchers with degrees from good universities from abroad, especially if they speak Estonian too, and have worked at the University of Tartu for some years. Support would be useful for career progression, instead of the career blocking which can be encountered.

There should be better appreciation for research in general. Funding has become a joke, and it is a career that could not be recommended for anyone to pursue under the present conditions.

If the balance is heavily tilted towards teaching instead of research, then the name of University does not apply. It would then have to be renamed Higher School or something else.

Seos ülikooliga: Töötaja