Issue #11 - 27 February 2008 | University of Tartu

Contacts of UT units

Faculty of Arts and Humanities
Faculty phone: 
+372 737 5341
Faculty address: 
Jakobi 2, rooms 116–121, 51005 Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    + 372 737 5341
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, rooms 116–121, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of History and Archaeology
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5651
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of Estonian and General Linguistics
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5221
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of Philosophy and Semiotics
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5314
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, rooms 309–352, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of Cultural Research
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5223
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 16, 51003 Tartu
  • School of Theology and Religious Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5301
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18–310, 50090 Tartu
  • College of Foreign Languages and Cultures
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, 51003 Tartu
  • Viljandi Culture Academy
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 435 5232
    Faculty address: 
    Posti 1, 71004 Viljandi
Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty phone: 
+372 737 5957
Faculty address: 
Lossi 36, 51003 Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    + 372 737 5900
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, 51003 Tartu
  • Institute of Education
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6440
    Faculty address: 
    Salme 1a–29, 50103 Tartu
  • Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5582
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36–301, 51003 Tartu
  • School of Economics and Business Administration
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6310
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 4, 50409 Tartu
  • Institute of Psychology
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5902
    Faculty address: 
    Näituse 2, 50409 Tartu
  • School of Law
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5390
    Faculty address: 
    Näituse 20–324, 50409 Tartu
  • Institute of Social Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5188
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, 51003 Tartu
  • Narva College
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 740 1900
    Faculty address: 
    Raekoja plats 2, 20307 Narva
  • Pärnu College
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 445 0520
    Faculty address: 
    Ringi 35, 80012 Pärnu
Faculty of Medicine
Faculty phone: 
+372 737 5326
Faculty address: 
Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5326
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4210
    Faculty address: 
    Biomeedikum, Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Pharmacy
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5286
    Faculty address: 
    Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Dentistry
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 731 9856
    Faculty address: 
    Raekoja plats 6, 51003 Tartu
  • Institute of Clinical Medicine
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5323
    Faculty address: 
    L. Puusepa 8, 50406 Tartu
  • Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4190
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Sport Sciences and Physiotherapy
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5360
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 5–205, 51005 Tartu
Faculty of Science and Technology
Faculty phone: 
+372 737 5820
Faculty address: 
Vanemuise 46–208, 51005 Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5820
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46–208, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of Computer Science
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5445
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 2, 50409 Tartu
  • Estonian Marine Institute
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 671 8902
    Faculty address: 
    Mäealuse 14, 12618 Tallinn
  • Institute of Physics
    Faculty address: 
    W. Ostwaldi 1, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Chemistry
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5261
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 14a, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Mathematics and Statistics
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5860
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 2, 50409 Tartu
  • Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5011
    Faculty address: 
    Riia 23, 23b–134, 51010 Tartu
  • Tartu Observatory
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4510
    Faculty address: 
    Observatooriumi 1, Tõravere, 61602 Tartumaa
  • Institute of Technology
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4800
    Faculty address: 
    Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5835
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46, 51003 Tartu
Institutions
  • Library
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5702
    Faculty address: 
    W. Struve 1, 50091 Tartu
  • Youth Academy
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5581
    Faculty address: 
    Uppsala 10, 51003 Tartu
  • Institute of Genomics
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4000
    Faculty address: 
    Riia 23b, 51010 Tartu
  • Museum
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5674
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 25, 51003 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Natural History Museum and Botanical Garden
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6076
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46, 51003 Tartu
Support Units
  • Administrative Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5606
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51005 Tartu
  • Centre for Entrepreneurship and Innovation
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6339
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, III floor, 51003 Tartu
  • University Office in Tallinn
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6600
    Faculty address: 
    Teatri väljak 3, 10143 Tallinn
  • Estates Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5137
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51005 Tartu
  • Finance Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5125
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 4, 51005 Tartu
  • Grant Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6215
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, III floor, 51003 Tartu
  • Information Technology Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6000, IT-help: +372 737 5500
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51005 Tartu
  • Human Resources Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5145
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, rooms 302 and 304, 50090 Tartu
  • Internal Audit Office
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 17–103, 51005 Tartu
  • Marketing and Communication Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5687
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, rooms 102, 104, 209, 210, 50090 Tartu
  • Office of Academic Affairs
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5620
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu
  • Procurement Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6632
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51005 Tartu
  • Rector's Strategy Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5600
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu
  • Student Council
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5400
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18b, 51005 Tartu
Other Units
  • University of Tartu Academic Sports Club
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5371
    Faculty address: 
    Ujula 4, 51008 Tartu
  • Tartu Student Village
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 740 9959
    Faculty address: 
    Narva mnt 25, 51013 Tartu
  • Tartu Students’ Club
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 730 2400
    Faculty address: 
    Kalevi 24, 51010 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Press
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5945
    Faculty address: 
    W. Struve 1, 50091 Tartu
  • Tartu University Hospital
    Faculty address: 
    L. Puusepa 1a, 50406 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Foundation
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5852
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu
  • View all other units

Contacts of UT units

Faculty of Arts and Humanities
Faculty phone: 
+372 737 5341
Faculty address: 
Jakobi 2, rooms 116–121, 51005 Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    + 372 737 5341
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, rooms 116–121, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of History and Archaeology
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5651
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of Estonian and General Linguistics
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5221
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of Philosophy and Semiotics
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5314
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 2, rooms 309–352, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of Cultural Research
    Faculty phone: 
    (+372) 737 5223
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 16, 51003 Tartu
  • School of Theology and Religious Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5301
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18–310, 50090 Tartu
  • College of Foreign Languages and Cultures
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, 51003 Tartu
  • Viljandi Culture Academy
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 435 5232
    Faculty address: 
    Posti 1, 71004 Viljandi
Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty phone: 
+372 737 5957
Faculty address: 
Lossi 36, 51003 Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    + 372 737 5900
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, 51003 Tartu
  • Institute of Education
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6440
    Faculty address: 
    Salme 1a–29, 50103 Tartu
  • Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5582
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36–301, 51003 Tartu
  • School of Economics and Business Administration
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6310
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 4, 50409 Tartu
  • Institute of Psychology
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5902
    Faculty address: 
    Näituse 2, 50409 Tartu
  • School of Law
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5390
    Faculty address: 
    Näituse 20–324, 50409 Tartu
  • Institute of Social Studies
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5188
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 36, 51003 Tartu
  • Narva College
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 740 1900
    Faculty address: 
    Raekoja plats 2, 20307 Narva
  • Pärnu College
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 445 0520
    Faculty address: 
    Ringi 35, 80012 Pärnu
Faculty of Medicine
Faculty phone: 
+372 737 5326
Faculty address: 
Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5326
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4210
    Faculty address: 
    Biomeedikum, Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Pharmacy
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5286
    Faculty address: 
    Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Dentistry
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 731 9856
    Faculty address: 
    Raekoja plats 6, 51003 Tartu
  • Institute of Clinical Medicine
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5323
    Faculty address: 
    L. Puusepa 8, 50406 Tartu
  • Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4190
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 19, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Sport Sciences and Physiotherapy
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5360
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 5–205, 51005 Tartu
Faculty of Science and Technology
Faculty phone: 
+372 737 5820
Faculty address: 
Vanemuise 46–208, 51005 Tartu
  • Dean's Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5820
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46–208, 51005 Tartu
  • Institute of Computer Science
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5445
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 2, 50409 Tartu
  • Estonian Marine Institute
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 671 8902
    Faculty address: 
    Mäealuse 14, 12618 Tallinn
  • Institute of Physics
    Faculty address: 
    W. Ostwaldi 1, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Chemistry
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5261
    Faculty address: 
    Ravila 14a, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Mathematics and Statistics
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5860
    Faculty address: 
    J. Liivi 2, 50409 Tartu
  • Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5011
    Faculty address: 
    Riia 23, 23b–134, 51010 Tartu
  • Tartu Observatory
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4510
    Faculty address: 
    Observatooriumi 1, Tõravere, 61602 Tartumaa
  • Institute of Technology
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4800
    Faculty address: 
    Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu
  • Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5835
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46, 51003 Tartu
Institutions
  • Library
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5702
    Faculty address: 
    W. Struve 1, 50091 Tartu
  • Youth Academy
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5581
    Faculty address: 
    Uppsala 10, 51003 Tartu
  • Institute of Genomics
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 4000
    Faculty address: 
    Riia 23b, 51010 Tartu
  • Museum
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5674
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 25, 51003 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Natural History Museum and Botanical Garden
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6076
    Faculty address: 
    Vanemuise 46, 51003 Tartu
Support Units
  • Administrative Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5606
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51005 Tartu
  • Centre for Entrepreneurship and Innovation
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6339
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, III floor, 51003 Tartu
  • University Office in Tallinn
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6600
    Faculty address: 
    Teatri väljak 3, 10143 Tallinn
  • Estates Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5137
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51005 Tartu
  • Finance Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5125
    Faculty address: 
    Jakobi 4, 51005 Tartu
  • Grant Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6215
    Faculty address: 
    Lossi 3, III floor, 51003 Tartu
  • Information Technology Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6000, IT-help: +372 737 5500
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51005 Tartu
  • Human Resources Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5145
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, rooms 302 and 304, 50090 Tartu
  • Internal Audit Office
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 17–103, 51005 Tartu
  • Marketing and Communication Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5687
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, rooms 102, 104, 209, 210, 50090 Tartu
  • Office of Academic Affairs
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5620
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu
  • Procurement Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 6632
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18a, 51005 Tartu
  • Rector's Strategy Office
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5600
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu
  • Student Council
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5400
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18b, 51005 Tartu
Other Units
  • University of Tartu Academic Sports Club
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5371
    Faculty address: 
    Ujula 4, 51008 Tartu
  • Tartu Student Village
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 740 9959
    Faculty address: 
    Narva mnt 25, 51013 Tartu
  • Tartu Students’ Club
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 730 2400
    Faculty address: 
    Kalevi 24, 51010 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Press
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5945
    Faculty address: 
    W. Struve 1, 50091 Tartu
  • Tartu University Hospital
    Faculty address: 
    L. Puusepa 1a, 50406 Tartu
  • University of Tartu Foundation
    Faculty phone: 
    +372 737 5852
    Faculty address: 
    Ülikooli 18, 50090 Tartu
  • View all other units

Issue #11 - 27 February 2008

ANNOUNCEMENTSScholarships for master’s degree programmes
NEWSIntake of international students in spring 2008
50 Reasons to Study Abroad
Cultural events at Tartu in spring 2008
EVENTSEstonian Independence Day celebration at UT
Lecture on Estonian-Finnish Relations by Seppo Zetterberg
Rector's visit to the University of Toronto
PEOPLEProf Risto Näätänen - Athlete Turned Distinguished Researcher

UT Events in 2007
___________________________________________________________________


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Scholarships for master’s degree programmes with instruction in English
The University of Tartu will award a total of 6 scholarships to students admitted in 2008 to the following master’s degree programmes instructed in English:

1. Baltic Studies – Master of Arts in Social Sciences
2. EU-Russian Studies – Master of Arts in Social Sciences
3. Financial and Actuarial Mathematics

One-time scholarships amounting to up to 2000 EUR per student will be awarded on the basis of previous academic standing (bachelor’s degree) towards tuition or living expenses.
Students interested in being considered for the scholarship need to send a short letter of request along with their application package for the master’s program of their choice.

Academic Affairs Office
University of Tartu
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NEWS

Intake of international students in spring 2008
In the spring semester 2008 the University of Tartu is the home university for 165 visiting international students, of whom 120 are new and just arrived. The biggest number of exchange students come from Poland, Germany and the US.

Among new international students the spring semester brought to Tartu the first exchange student from the University of Melbourne, Australia. A bilateral cooperation agreement between the University of Melbourne and University of Tartu was signed in 2007. Also for the first time, the University of Tartu is pleased to host a student from the consortium of MAUI (Mid American Universities International). There is a student exchange programme between MAUI and the Utrecht Network, of which the University of Tartu is a member. Our students have the chance to attend the University of Melbourne and MAUI universities next academic year. The cooperation agreements taking effect indicates the continuing internationalisation of the University of Tartu.

The welcome reception for newly arrived international students celebrated the diversity of the student population at the UT.

Text: Margot Laneman, International Student Service
Picture: Margot Laneman
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50 Reasons to Study Abroad

…is the name of the student photo exhibition opened at the University of Tartu Library. The exhibition features the most exciting and memorable moments spent by University of Tartu students while studying abroad. Selection of the best photos accompanied by bright comments is open for everybody to enjoy on the third floor of the Library until the 30th of March.

The nine-member panel of judges evaluated 101 photos submitted to the contest, looking for the best conveyed message of what makes studying abroad unique, special and useful. A bit more than a half of all contest photos found their way to the exhibition. The best three pictures were taken by Keit Kukk and Tuuli Raudla in Italy, and Tajo Oja in Great Britain. All three give a fresh look at the very basic and fundamental notions: independence, boundaries and cooperation. Independence the student way, disappearance of boundaries in nature and elsewhere, cooperation giving birth to big things and much more is out at the exhibition. “Such a contest is a good opportunity to link students with university and give them an opportunity for sharing experiences from a somewhat different angle,” commented Ave Jalakas, a member of the Student Council.

All three winning photos were taken by Erasmus Program students. The contest was organised by the Department of Academic Affairs of the University of Tartu.

Text: Inga Külmoja
Pictures from the exhibition: Independence by Keit Kukk, United Europe by Tajo Oja, Back from picnic by Kadri Sarjas
_________________________________Back to top...


Cultural events at Tartu in spring 2008


March usually brings thoughts of longer days and sunnier weather. There are many lovely events taking place in Tartu during the first month of spring and hopefully everybody will find something suitable from the following overview of March events. It is going to be a month full of different special days like the International Women’s Day (8 March), St.Patrick’s day (17 March), Francophonia Day (March 20), Easter holidays (21-23 March) and most importantly – the beginning of Spring!

04.03.2008 at 19 – Concert “Pianissimo” by Estonian-Finnish piano quintet at UT Festive Hall
07.03.2008 at 19 – Love songs by Estonian Composers - concert performed by Estonian TV Girls’ Choir at the Vanemuine Concert Hall
13.03.2008 at 19 – Spring Concert of Vanemuine Syphony Orchestra at St.John’s Church
14.03.2008 at 10 – Children’s play “Ouh la la les loups!!“ (in Swiss French) to celebrate this year’s Francophonia Day at German Cultural Institute
15.03.2008 at 11.30-15.00 – Family Fun Day “Polish Easter Traditions” at Tartu Toy Museum: take part in traditional Polish Easter games and get arty by decorating beautiful Easter eggs
15.03.2008 at 18 – J.C.Bach “St Matthew Passion” performed by chamber choir “Voces Musicales” and baroque ensemble “Corelli Consort” at St.John’s Church
15.03.2008 at 19 – “… the new sound of trumpet” - concert by Gabor Boldoczki (trumpet, Hungary) and Martin Bernreuther (organ, Germany) at the Vanemuine Concert Hall. Concert organised in cooperation with Hungarian Cultural Institute.
16.03.2008 at 16 – Spring Concert of Tartu University Chamber Choir at UT Festive Hall
17.03.2008 at 17 – opening of Barbara Klemm’s photo exhibition “1968 Student Riot in Western Germany“ at German Cultural Institute (exhbition open until 28.03.2008)
20.03.2008 at 19 – J.S.Bach “St.John Passion” performed by Latvian Radio Choir, Riga Sinfonietta Orchestra (Latvia) at St John’s Church
22.03.2008 at 17 – Tartu School Students’ Fashion Show “My people” at the Vanemuine Concert Hall
22.03.2008 at 18 – Worldmusic Festival “MAAjaILM 2008” at Athena Cultural Centre
27.03.2008 at 19 – Concert “Ethnic Series” by vocal ensemble MENAiset (Finland) at the Vanemuise Concert Hall
24-30.03.2008 - Tartu Festival of Visual Culture “Worldfilm 2008“ organised by Estonian National Museum and Worldfilm Society (see festival website for programme of selected films www.worldfilm.ee)

Text: Kersti Heek
Picture: http://www.visittartu.com/
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EVENTS

Estonian Independence Day celebration at UT

On Friday, 22 February the University of Tartu celebrated the 90th Anniversary of the Republic of Estonia with a ceremonial meeting in the University Assembly Hall.

The programme of the meeting included an opening address by Professor Alar Karis, Rector of the University of Tartu, and festive addresses by Urmas Kruuse, Mayor of Tartu, and Martin Saar, 2nd year student of English Language and Literature. The anniversary speech, titled Why Do We Need the Republic of Estonia?, was delivered by Dr. Pärtel Piirimäe, Associate Professor at the UT Institute of History and Archaeology.
For Independence Day, the University's large medal of honour was awarded to Kalle Kasemaa, Professor Emeritus at the Faculty of Theology.

This year for the first time, the ceremony also included the conferment of the Lennart Meri Research Awards, a new science prize instituted in 2007. It will be awarded annually by the University of Tartu Foundation in two categories: monographs and master theses. The first two awards went to Valter Lang, UT Professor of Archaeology, for his monograph The Bronze and Early Iron Ages in Estonia, published in 2007, and to Kristina Veidenbaum for her master’s thesis titled TV News Magazine as Social Resource for Teenagers. Qualitative Study on Reception of Reporter Television News Programme, defended in 2007 at the UT Department of Journalism and Communication.

The musical interludes between the speeches and conferment ceremonies were provided by the University of Tartu Academic Women’s Choir (conductor Triin Koch). The following concert featured mezzo-soprano Annaliisa Pillak and pianist Jaanika Rand-Sirp, who performed pieces by composers Mart Saar, Tõnu Kõrvits and Jean Sibelius.

Text: Anneli Maaring
Picture: Andres Tennus
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Lecture on Estonian-Finnish Relations by Finnish Historian Seppo Zetterberg

The lecture titled Estonia and Finland in the 1930s and the factors affecting the conclusion of the agreement on cultural cooperation was delivered on 18 February in the White Hall of the University History Museum by Seppo Zetterberg, Professor of History at the University of Jyväskylä. The presentation was dedicated to the 90th anniversary of the Republic of Estonia.

In his lecture, Professor Zetterberg focused on Estonian-Finnish relations in the late 1930s and explained the background of the convention on intellectual cooperation signed between the two countries on 1 December 1937.

He also presented his book Viron historia /History of Estonia/, published in 2007 by the Finnish Literature Society. It is a comprehensive study that covers Estonian history from the Ice Age to the present. The book, which runs more than 800 pages, recently received the annual Lauri Jäntti Award for promoting Finnish scientific literature. Viron historia will be published in Estonian by the Tänapäev publishing house, probably in the autumn of 2009.

Seppo Zetterberg, Professor of General History at the University of Jyväskylä, a member of the Finnish Academy of Sciences and an honorary member of the Learned Estonian Society, is a highly regarded scholar of Estonian history. In the years 1994–1996 he worked as the Director of the Finnish Institute in Estonia, and since 1997 he has been the editor-in-chief of the Kanava political journal. Professor Zetterberg is the author of numerous books on Finnish and Estonian history, four of which have also been published in Estonian.

The lecture was organised by the University of Tartu and the Finnish Institute in cooperation with the Embassy of Finland, the Learned Estonian Society and the University of Turku Foundation.

Interview with Professor Seppo Zetterberg

“Estonian history is like alcohol to me,” declared Seppo Zetterberg, Professor of General History at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, on Monday 18 February to his audience at the University History Museum. Professor Zetterberg, a distinguished researcher of Estonian history, delivered a lecture dedicated to the 90th anniversary of the Republic of Estonia and presented his book Viron Historia, which gives an overview of Estonian history from the Ice Age to the year 2007. It took Zetterberg 6–7 years to write this 810-page book that contains two million characters and weighs 2.4 kg.

Why did you write such a voluminous book on Estonian history?

I have studied Estonian history for more than 40 years; it has formed a very important part of my academic career.

How did you discover Estonia?

By accident. In November 1966, when I was a young history student at the University of Helsinki, we visited the War Archives in Helsinki where the archivist also showed us materials relating to Estonian military history. At first these materials didn’t seem particularly interesting to me, but since many Finns participated in the Estonian War of Independence, I gradually started to take interest in topics connected with Estonia.

How does Estonian history appear to a Finn?

It is fascinating and very dramatic, entirely different from Finnish history.

It has been said about your book that it has been written in a language that is understandable to the common reader. Who was your target group?

The audience I had in mind was the Finns who read popular science books and are interested in history. I am surprised that my book has been so popular. The book is huge and costs a lot, but it sells well. I think it shows that Finns are still very much interested in Estonia.
I always try to write beautiful Finnish. In my opinion, Finnish students’ knowledge of their native language is decreasing. Of course, we must learn foreign languages, but at the same time we must be able to use Finnish that is understandable to readers.

How interested are Finnish students in the history of Estonia?


They are interested and this pleases me, but it is their limited knowledge of the language that poses a problem. Two or three of my students are currently here at the University of Tartu writing their master’s theses, and they can read Estonian. Unfortunately, such students are rather rare. Students are now fluent in English, which means that they are more attracted to topics connected with English and American history.

Do students use your book in their studies?

Yes, they use it when writing their course works or master’s theses. The history of the Baltic countries is a mandatory subject at our university. It was proposed that my book would be made compulsory reading for them, but I disapproved of the idea, because the book is far too long. If the students were forced to read it, they would begin to hate Estonian history.

Which part of the book was the most difficult to write?


It was the more recent history that posed more problems, for example the Soviet period and the period of re-independence after 1991. These periods were very difficult to cover, because they have not been researched very thoroughly. Let’s hope that many new studies will be published in Estonia, so that in 10–20 years the situation will be better.

Which period in Estonian history would you highlight as the most important era, which perhaps continues to influence Estonians to this day?


I think that it would be the Middle Ages when after German conquest Estonian peasants were reduced to serfdom. The same oppressive conditions lasted for centuries.

Is this the most important difference between Estonians and Finns?


Yes. If I had to say it in one word, I regard this as the most important difference between Finnish and Estonian history.

Interview by Sigrid Sõerunurk, Universitas Tartuensis newspaper
Pictures: Andres Tennus

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Rector's visit to the University of Toronto

The cooperation between the two long-time partners – the Universities of Toronto and Tartu – is worth being developed intensively, confirms Professor Alar Karis, Rector of the University of Tartu, after his visit to Canada in January. The University of Tartu has had a bilateral cooperation agreement with the University of Toronto for researcher and student exchange since 1991. Since then, the University of Toronto has occupied a special place among Tartu’s partner universities thanks to the support a large Estonian community stationed in Toronto.

The support of Toronto Estonians
According to Sirje Üprus, Head of International Cooperation of the University of Tartu researchers of the two universities have a long history of cooperation in the fields of psychiatry, psychology, chemistry, pharmacology and history. “Professor Olev Träss, now Professor Emeritus at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, has been the most active agent in furthering Tartu-Toronto relations and in recruiting support from the Toronto Estonian community,” she adds. “Jüri Kivimäe, Professor of History and Chair of Estonian Studies, who since 1999 has headed the University of Toronto’s Elmar Tampõld Chair of Estonian Studies, has also been helpful in promoting cooperation between the two institutions.”

According Professor Kivimäe, the exchange of students presently takes place mainly on the master and doctoral levels. He asserted that it is no easy task to find students in Toronto who would be interested in going to Tartu as an exchange student. “The main factors that discourage applicants are the differences in study programmes and difficulties in the transfer of credit points, which can be complicated enough even between Canadian universities,” he explains.

“To date, the volume of exchange has been rather modest and one-way,” says Sirje Üprus, "Presently, there are two exchange students from the University of Tartu currently studying in Toronto: Mihkel Kree (Physics) and Sander Heinsalu (Economics). Canadian students who have come to Tartu have mainly participated in our International Summer University courses,” she adds.

As regards the development of contacts between Tartu and Toronto researchers, a positive impetus was definitely provided by the American Association of Baltic Studies’ (AABS) 19th Conference on Baltic Studies organised by the Chair of Estonian Studies in 2004, which attracted many researchers from Estonia. “Former Toronto Professors Tiina Kirss and Andres Kasekamp are now working at the University of Tartu. They both know the University of Toronto very well and are motivated by the spirit of cooperation,” says Professor Kivimäe.
Professor Tiina Kirss describes the University of Toronto as a dynamic and diverse institution with a large and valuable library and a vibrant international intellectual environment which continues to show interest and hospitality towards “small languages.” “Professor Kivimäe has developed the Elmar Tampõld Chair of Estonian Studies into a strong bridgehead, offering excellent opportunities for development which doctoral students from Estonia could and should use more fully,” she concludes.

Promising fields of cooperation
Rector Karis discussed the continuation of cooperation between the two universities and the opportunities for widening the scope of the exchange agreement in a meeting with Judith Wolfson, Vice President responsible for the University of Toronto’s international cooperation links. “The University of Toronto would be interested in sending their young researchers to Tartu, for example for one year after defending their doctoral thesis,” said Rector Karis.

During his visit, Rector Karis also tried to identify the areas in which it would be beneficial for both universities to create new contacts. “During my meeting with Vice President Judith Wolfson and her assistant, Lorna Jean Edmonds, I presented our current areas of scientific excellence,” says Rector Karis. He suggests bio-medicine as one very promising field of cooperation. “The merger of the Estonian Genome Foundation with the University of Tartu has opened up new opportunities for cooperation,” says the rector. The rector also had the opportunity to visit the University of Toronto’s Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, and the Foundation for Innovation which engages in research in medicine and its related disciplines.

In a meeting with Professor Jeffrey Kopstein, Director of the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES), one of North America’s leading academic institutes for the study of the member countries of the European Union and the countries of the former Soviet Union, Rector Karis presented the European Union-Russian Studies MA-Programme recently created by the UT EuroCollege as a platform for cooperation in the field of European Studies.

The rector observed that similarly to Estonia, in Canada the link between universities and entrepreneurs is relatively weak. “Although Toronto is the seat of many large corporations, their headquarters, which are located mainly in the USA, are reluctant to commission research from a distant university,” he observed. “Nevertheless, R&D activities are actively pursued at Toronto and I think we have a lot to learn from each other, as to how to bring researchers and entrepreneurs together.”

Text: Varje Sootak, Sirje Üprus and Universitas Tartuensis newspaper
Picture: private collection
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PEOPLE

Professor Risto Kalervo Näätänen – Athlete Turned Distinguished Researcher

Risto Kalervo Näätänen, Finnish Professor of Psychology working at the University of Tartu, who at the end of last year received the distinguished Philips Nordic Prize for Research, was driven in his youth by the desire to prove that an athlete can make a breakthrough in science.

To be fair, the prize doesn’t belong solely to Näätänen. A great deal of work was done by Professor Teija Kujala, his successor at the Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, and her work group. “For many years we have studied the development of the brain and psychology in children together and she is a great co-worker,” Näätänen praises his former student and colleague.

Together they completed the research project, which took approximately a quarter of a century, aimed at helping children with learning difficulties. “We worked on it for a rather long time and now I am extremely glad to know what happens in the brain and how our method works,” Näätänen is content with the results.

With the help of the award-winning mismatch-negativity or MMN method discovered by Näätänen, it is possible to identify the type of hearing and speech difficulties the child is suffering from and how brain functions recover as a result of the treatment.

“The idea is to show the child visually how he or she should react to a certain sound,” says the professor. Special computerised AV games were developed at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki which parents can purchase for their children on the commercial market. According to Näätänen, this treatment has been very effective. “Children’s brain functions show signs of improvement within just weeks,” he states.

Sometimes you are lucky

“For a scientist it is interesting that theories indeed sometimes work,” Näätänen smiles. In science things don’t always work out and there can be much disappointment. This makes success all the more satisfying.
Anyone who knew Näätänen in his youth would hardly have expected that one day he would become a recipient of a distinguished research award. “As far as science is concerned, nobody had faith in me because I was more interested in sports,” he recalls. An indirect impulse to take interest in science came from Näätänen’s father, who was a professor of anatomy. “His example gave me the idea that it might be interesting to become a scientist, a professor,” says the laureate. He wanted to try whether he could do the same things as his father. Upon entering the university, he began to study seriously and things worked out fine.

He then received a scholarship in the US where in the mid-1960s he learned various psychological methodologies. After that he returned to Finland, but has often spent periods abroad for professional development. For example, the MMS method he discovered five years ago in the Netherlands.
Näätänen is a mentor to many young Estonian as well as Finnish researchers. “I enjoy teaching students. However, my real joy is in trying to understand better what all the data means together. Developing a working theory is the most rewarding part of a researcher’s work,” says the professor.

Science versus sports

In Näätänen’s opinion there are quite a few parallels that can be drawn between research and world-class sports. In both, you must be willing to give up some of your personal time. “You must focus tightly on your goal, but at the same time you need to know how to not work when it’s necessary,” he smirks. In his opinion, many scientists burn out fast by putting all their effort in the first kilometre of a marathon. However, he is ready to confess that sometimes he himself has problems with self-discipline. “I can throw myself into work, but I cannot force myself to rest,” he admits. In research one must have a good stress-tolerance, to keep you going. In order to unwind, he still does a lot of physical exercise that helps him keep fit and sane.

Professor Näätänen, who has travelled widely in the world, came to Tartu with the encouragement of Jüri Allik, UT Professor of Psychology. The first contact between the future colleagues occurred in the 1980s at Estonian-Finnish conferences on cognitive psychology. “We discovered that we shared an interest in phoneme perception. There is an interesting difference between Estonian and Finnish. In the two languages almost all the vowels are the same. However, if Finns try to say “õlu” (Estonian word for “beer”), they just can’t do it,” Näätänen giggles. Together they established that Finns simply don’t have memory for the “õ” vowel. This was the first discovery that hints to traces of speech memory in the human brain.

Estonia more welcoming than Finland

However, apart from fruitful cooperation with his colleagues in Tartu, Näätänen’s decision to come to Estonia was made easier by the age limit for professors in Finland. Last summer he turned 68, which is the last line in Finland. So, why not then come to Estonia, where there is no age discrimination and which has much more in common with Finland than for instance the US?

Since summer 2007, Näätänen has worked in Tartu as a professor of Cognitive Neuropsychology. His contract with the university runs for another four and a half years. “I am mainly guiding doctoral students and participate in planning new projects in my research field,” he explains. Currently steps are being taken to equip the cognitive brain research group with better research facilities. “I think that there is good intellectual capacity and motivation, an atmosphere for scientific findings. But as for laboratory facilities and buildings, there’s definitely room for improvement,” he thinks.

He sees many promising young minds preferring other options to a career in science. “In Finland we have lost some very good engineers to large companies like Nokia, where they can earn much more,” says Näätänen, and hopes that this will not be the case in Estonia. In his opinion, things could be improved by offering a strong post-doctoral programme with a salary comparable with that paid in other fields.

Currently, the recent laureate of the Philips Nordic Prize is writing a book and doing research in possibilities to predict the prospects of recovery of coma patients. “In a positive course, it would provide more hope to the patient’s relatives and would encourage them to go on stimulating the patient, like for instance by bringing in the patient’s dog, using familiar sounds. But we don’t know yet whether our theories will work,” Näätänen reveals his plans for the future.
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Risto Kalervo Näätänen (b. 1939), Finnish psychologist and neuroscientist, discoverer of the mismatch negativity phenomenon.

Professor at the Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki (1975–1999), Head of the Helsinki Brain Research Center (2001–2007), member of the Finnish Academy of Science (since 1985). Since 2007, he is Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Tartu Institute of Psychology.
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Text: Merilyn Merisalu, Universitas Tartuensis newspaper
Picture: Philips
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